Jitter Room, a breakcore movie by Ruby My Dear & Lisa Chabbert.


Somewhere in a depopulated countryside, three children carry a stained tarpaulin. Inside it is a corpse. They too are dirty. They are wearing odd costumes. Snot is dripping down their noses…

… We do not know where they come from. We do not know where they are going. Somewhere between a rite of passage, a funeral procession, and a children’s game, they trudge through the mud. Nothing can get in the way of this macabre ceremony, not the elements, or the circling crows or even their afternoon snack.

About

Jitter Room was born from the collaboration between Lisa Chabbert, director and photographer, and Julien Chastagnol, electronica composer known as Ruby My Dear. Their worlds intersect where fiction, documentary, sensory experience, and video meet.

On the one hand, the sonic intricacy of breakcore, stemming from electronica, jazz, hip-hop, jungle, trip-hop… On the other, a raw and immersive visual aesthetic oscillating between darkness and light. For Jitter Room they come together in a narrative driven, realistic but nonetheless sensitive approach of our world.

Project note

“Julien is a friend. I have been listening to his music since his very start. Making a movie together has seemed like an obvious project to the both of us for a long time. We chose Jitter Room for its simple narrative strength. The strength of a progressive melodic loop evoking an endless and repetitive march: some kind of laborious struggle. The structure of the track includes important moments of calm where actions and shots can stretch out: leaving room for a singular story to be told. Musical and visual creation will draw on each other to shape this video. The story is one of three children who symbolically free themselves from the adults. Their journey takes place in the midst of a vast countryside, empty of humans. They are left alone to their endeavour, prey to unstable elements. Childhood is theme that is dear to me. It is a time of learning where death is already part of the picture. Death is to be treated without drama, as something entirely natural belonging to the normal cycle of life. That is why in this story, the funeral procession is riddled with games and childish spontaneity without giving in into morbidity. The setting will be crude, but it will also be eerie and light, with a clean yet brutal visual aesthetic. The black and white picture, grainy and rough, lets us underline vivid contrasts such as the ones in Ruby My Dear’s music. Jitter Room revealed itself as the inevitable intimate and creative collision, between our two universes.” Lisa Chabbert